Fall jacket

I planned to make this jacket forever ago.  To be precise, I made a muslin for it in June last year.  With pregnancy and all the weight changes, I decided to not put it off until I got back to my fighting weight again.  I figured that I loved the style too much to not be able to wear it for a year, so I hung up my muslin in my sewing room as a happy reminder of a project to come.

Now that I’m to my fighting weight minus a few more pounds, I pulled out the stretch cotton sateen I had reserved for this jacket.

Burda 2-2007-104

Tested patterns make for quick work.  Having already traced and altered the pattern ages ago, I cut it all out lightning fast.  The width of this fabric was just shy of what I needed to make a proper belt, so I pieced it, figuring that my topstitching would cover the seams in the back.  The only thing I wished I had done is interfaced the belt like Burda told me to.  Normally I wouldn’t on a self belt, but because there’s stretch in this fabric, I think it would’ve helped it hold its shape a little better.

Sometimes convenience tools mock you.  Because this was a solid, rather boring fabric, I added a lot of topstitching.  I had two spools of Mettler cotton silk-finish thread I had bought for topstitching–one coral, one magenta.  I tested them both on a scrap to see which one I liked better.  This blue leans ever so slightly towards purple, so the magenta looked really nice, but the coral was so pretty.  In the end, I liked them both equally, so I hitched up my denim double needle and went to town.  I like the spacing of the double needle, but I would have been more accurate on corners (especially on the belt carriers and sleeve tabs) with a single needle.  The double needle zigzaggy bobbin show is also on the wrong side of the belt–it doesn’t show when I’m wearing it, but it’s also not the prettiest thing.  Some extra time with a single needle would have made for prettier topstitching on the belt.

Use the right notions.  I finished it all off with some denim snaps instead of sew-on snaps because I had them, and the scale was right for the jacket.  While I like the sporty look of them, denim snaps fasten more firmly than sew-on snaps.  That’s good for keeping your pants up, but with all of the taking off and putting on of a jacket that happens, normal snaps are a better choice.  I have to be pretty careful undoing the snaps here so they don’t rip out.

Overall, I love this jacket.  The me-without-kids-living-in-some-European-vista version of myself would totally be wearing this whilst riding a teal Vespa carrying bread, wine, enormous greens for soup, and a costumed dachshund.  The high collar is a fun feature and surprisingly practical.  It kept my neck safe from sunburn all day as we walked around the San Diego Zoo though I forgot our sunscreen.  I think it will also be a practical wind shield, but I have yet to test that.

My full review is here.

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9 responses to “Fall jacket

  1. Fabulous jacket!!! I am really loving the topstitching!!!

  2. It looks great! I love the color and the styling. (And miss the days when Burda put out patterns like this more often.)

  3. I love the pattern and the fabric. You did a great job and and still learning how to make it your own. Tah-Dah

  4. Look how beautiful you are!! I could TOTALLY see you on that teal Vespa!! Another awesome creation girl, you go with your mad skillz…love it!! :)

  5. So adorable! I love your topstitching, and the overall style is so chic.

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