Batch fitting

Last week I sat down and drew out my goals for sewing for the month.  I am in need of summer clothes fast that aren’t scrubby t-shirts or shorts that I bought 11 pounds ago and are now falling off of me.  For once, I want to have a summer where I can beat the heat with my clothes and look like a lady too.

Here’s what I came up with: 

I’ll out myself and say that I sew knits as often as I do not just because I like them but because they’re a gazillion times easier to fit than wovens.  If you notice, there’s only 1 knit item in this batch.  This will be a great opportunity for me to figure out some fitting with wovens. 

I also decided that fitting takes up a whole lot of mental space.  I measure my patterns, trace them off, cut out a practice, see what I need to change, trace out more if necessary, cut out more practices if necessary, get things nice, cut out real fabric, construct, finish.  To repeat this cycle endlessly can sometimes feel not unlike the plight of poor Sisyphus.  I feel like if I can do one big round of fitting for several garments at a time, maybe I’ll save my brain some strain at the bottom of the hill later. 

I’ve been fitting the patterns, and paperclipping each one together and hanging them on the peg board before going on to fitting the next.  It’s been 3 days and I’ve made 4 seperate muslins for 3 separate patterns.  2 went rather quickly and didn’t need much tweaking–a little shortening here, but nothing dramatic.  The button-down blouse has taken a little more thought process.  I managed to avoid an FBA, which I’m grateful for because I’ve always ended up with so much waist distortion when I’ve done them in the past.  I will say that I’ve felt really relaxed and calm about fitting all of these instead of the usual frenzy/panic I put myself in at the start of a new project.  This seems rather counterintuitive that more causes less stress, and I I can’t say that I’ll batch fit all of the time, but I’ve actually enjoyed it this time.

Here are 3 of the fabrics in this first round of my plan.  The mini black gingham is on my cut table at the moment, but I’m sure you can imagine what that looks like.  I’ve actually fitted the pattern for the mini black gingham and not the red and blue floral fabric, but I forgot that the mini black gingham was on my cut table when I snapped this.

The red and blue floral isn’t actually cotton as I thought when I bought it.  It burns like silk, but usually at Denver Fabrics, they separate their silk flat folds from the rest, so maybe it’s a silk blend.  Who knows?  But a good old bit of mystery fabric never hurt anyone, right?

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6 responses to “Batch fitting

  1. I love your sewing plan. Can’t wait to see the finished items, especially that skirt with the shaped godets. I’ve been meaning to make a skirt like that forever, and you don’t even need to buy a pattern for it, if you already have a good straight skirt pattern that you can manipulate. Maybe I’ll make one too. (Of course, after the other four projects I need to finish!)

  2. I love how organized and methodical you are. I think writing down your sewing goals is such a good idea. It will certainly guarantee that you get this done. I also love how you challenge yourself to learn new things and that you are not afraid to try new techniques. You are already an excellent seamstress, but you are most definitely going to be a pro before long.

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